Photo of Teresa Lewi

Teresa Lewi represents and counsels employers on a wide range of federal, state, and local employment laws. She focuses her practice on trade secrets, non-competition, executive compensation, separation, employee mobility, discrimination, and wage-and-hour issues.
Teresa has successfully tried cases in federal and state courts, and she also conducts internal investigations concerning trade secrets and workplace issues.

Teresa regularly represents clients in the life sciences, technology, financial services, sports, and entertainment industries. She has resolved matters through the pretrial, trial, and appeals process, as well as through alternative dispute resolution methods. In particular, Teresa has helped companies achieve highly favorable outcomes in high-stakes disputes over the protection of trade secrets or enforcement of agreements with employees.

Teresa’s practice also includes conducting workplace audits, drafting employment agreements and workplace policies, and advising companies on employment law developments (including recent changes to non-competition laws and COVID-19-related regulations).

In response to the growing unemployment numbers due to business slowdowns across the country, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act provides expanded unemployment insurance (UI) benefits to workers impacted by COVID-19.  The move is no doubt well intentioned, but serious questions have been raised about the specific benefit design adopted by Congress and the ability of state unemployment agencies—hardly models of efficiency in the best of times—to respond to the deluge of claims now inundating them.  In fact, one of the potentially most attractive UI features in the new law—its short-time compensation provisions—seems likely to face serious obstacles to implementation due to lack of administrative resources and the vagaries of state law.

Continue Reading Unemployment Insurance Benefits under the CARES Act

As reported in our Client Alert, the new Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act includes provisions to increase the use of short-time compensation (STC) programs (also known as work sharing or shared-work programs). Section 2108 of the CARES Act provides federal funding for 100% of the STC paid by states with programs already in place. In addition, Section 2109 provides federal funding for 50% of the STC paid by states that currently do not have formal programs but implement arrangements, and Section 2110 provides grants for implementing and improving STC programs.

Continue Reading The CARES Act and Short-Time Compensation Programs